Friday Session #8: Designing Multimedia iOS Apps

Please note, this blog entry is from a previous course. You might want to check out the current one.

This weeks Friday session is named “Designing Multimedia iOS Apps (December 2, 2011)” and can be found at iTunes. Its slides are available at Stanford.

In this lecture Jason Riggs presents how to use OpenGL ES and C++ to create a game. Starting from a skeleton framework this demo implements a fully functional mini game.

Further references:

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Friday Session #7: Smule

Please note, this blog entry is from a previous course. You might want to check out the current one.

This weeks Friday session presents Smule, a company specialized in developing social music applications. It can be found on iTunes titled “Smule (November 18, 2011)”.

The lecturer is Ge Wang, assistant professor at the center of computer research in music and acoustics at Stanford and co-founder of Smule. He starts by introducing how music is generated on music, e.g. ChucK an audo programming language for real-time synthesis, composition, performance and analysis; its usage in laptop orchestras, e.g. Slork and Plork; and emphasizes how it can be applied on the iPhone to create social music experience, e.g. Ocarina a digital flute, Sing! and Glee Karaoke karaoke machines allowing to sing with other people online, Magic Piano and Magic Guitar further digital instruments.

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Friday Session #6: Building Apps that People Want

Please note, this blog entry is from a previous course. You might want to check out the current one.

This weeks Friday session addresses marketing concepts of apps. It can be found on iTunes titled “Building Apps that People Want (November 11, 2011)”.

The lecturer is Mike Ghaffary, director of business development at Yelp and co-founder of BarMax, the most expensive iPhone/iPad app on the AppStore. He stresses three keys in the success of an app – its impact (“it should change the world” and “solve a real problem”), the criticality of its distribution (“publish early”, “get distribution partners”, “use users feedback”), and the composition of the team (“product manager is essential”, “friends do not make good business partners – coworkers do”).

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Friday Session #5: Time Profiler

Please note, this blog entry is from a previous course. You might want to check out the current one.

This weeks Friday session addresses the Time Profiler. It can be found on iTunes titled “Time Profiler (November 4, 2011)”.

In this session Alexander Chia shows when and how to use the time profiler on an example project calculation pi via a monte carlo algorithm and on a graphic calculator.

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Friday Session #4: Introduction to AVFoundation

Please note, this blog entry is from a previous course. You might want to check out the current one.

This weeks Friday session addresses the AV Foundation Framework. It can be found on iTunes titled “Introduction to AVFoundation (October 21, 2011)”.

In this lecture Salik Syed gives an overview on how the Objective-C interface can be used to access audio-visual media under iOS. After an high level discussion on the API he shows in a demo how to manipulate a video from the camera of an iPhone in real time.
Continue reading “Friday Session #4: Introduction to AVFoundation”

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Friday Session #3: Getting your application running on a device

Please note, this blog entry is from a previous course. You might want to check out the current one.

This weeks Friday Session is/was called “Getting your application running on a device”. This lecture does not show up on iTunes, most likely, because it describes how to use a Stanford University Developer License.

However, connecting an actual device is not too difficult, once you received your valid developer license from Apple.

In Xcode go to the Organizer (button on the upper right hand side of the screen). There you will find a tab called Devices. Now connect your iPhone/iPad to your computer … and Xcode will do the rest … or at least will tell you what to do …

… and just recently Stanford provided some notes to for this session with the mysterious name “Section 3: Developing on Devices”.

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Friday Session #2: Xcode and Source Code Management

Please note, this blog entry is from a previous course. You might want to check out the current one.

Between lecture #4 and lecture #5 the second Friday session addressed source control. It can be found on iTunes titled “Xcode and Source Code Management (October 7, 2011)”.

This lecture explains how to use the local source control functionality of Xcode, as well as how to add source control later on if you did not add it when you initially created the project.

If not added initially the git has to activated manually via the terminal. First change into your project directory, find UserInterfaceState.xcuserstate which you have to .gitignore because you do not want to add it to your repository as it changes practically by only looking at Xcode. e.g.:
Continue reading “Friday Session #2: Xcode and Source Code Management”

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